Encino Tire & Service

Services

Shocks & Struts
Let our trained professionals inspect your shocks & struts today for any conditions that may result in poor vehicle performance. Your shocks and struts play a vital role in your steering response, vehicle stability, & stopping abilities. Our trained professionals will recommend and service the shocks and struts on your vehicle to provide you with a “peace of mind” driving experience. If you notice uneven tread wear or excessive leaning or swaying when making turns, or drastic nose diving when braking, schedule an appointment for an inspection today.
Batteries and Electrical

Batteries and Electrical1. Battery

When your car’s engine is off, the battery provides the required power to the rest of the system, as well as during start-up (cranking). It also supplements the power from the charging system during periods of high demand.

2. Charging System

This is the heart of the electrical system. It consists of three main components: the belt-driven alternator, various electrical circuits, and a voltage regulator. The alternator supplies power to the electrical system and recharges the battery after your car has started. Just like it sounds, the voltage regulator controls the voltage, keeping it within the operating range of the electrical system.

3. Starting System

This system consumes more electrical power than any other in your car. The starting system consists of three components which work in tandem: the ignition switch, the starter relay or solenoid, and the starter motor. The ignition switch controls the starter solenoid, which activates the starter motor. The starter motor then turns the engine until your car starts. Although today’s systems differ greatly in complexity with all the technology incorporated into today’s modern vehicles, we are well versed in today’s systems.

Lubrication Services

Lubrication ServicesChange engine oil and oil filter, lubrication of chassis components (suspension and drivetrain components with grease fittings) and a safety inspection of lighting and major systems. Check the owner’s manual to see if your driving habits are considered to be “severe service.” This type of driving requires more frequent oil changes, warns the Car Care Council. Have the oil changed accordingly, usually every 3-5,000 miles. For less wear and tear on the engine, drivers in cold climes (sub-zero driving temperatures) should drop their oil weight from 10-W30 to 5-W30. Your mom and dad would probably suggest simply moving to someplace warmer. Description: The typical oil filter consists of a high-strength steel housing containing various types of filtering media. An anti-drainback valve prevents oil from running out of the filter when the engine is off. Today’s oil filters have a convenient spin-on design that makes removal and installation easy. Purpose: The oil filter sifts out contaminants, allowing the oil to flow through the engine unrestricted. Should the oil filter become restricted or clogged with contaminants, they will flow around the filter. This bypassing is a safety mechanism, but you never want to let oil and filter changes go so long that bypassing takes place.

Maintenance Tips/Suggestions
For best results, consult your owner’s manual, but consider that your driving probably constitutes a severe maintenance schedule. Usually, this means oil and filter changes every 3,000 miles or 3 months. If you change the filter yourself, dispose of it properly. Take used filters to a facility that accepts them. Used filters can be crushed, removing the used oil and the steel part of the filter can be recycled. The oil from one used, seemingly innocent filter leaking into a landfill can taint 62,000 gallons of ground water.

Engine Performance

Engine Controls

1. Mass Airflow Sensor

2. Throttle Position Sensor

3. Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor

4. Coolant Temperature Sensor

5. Exhaust Oxygen Sensor

6. Crankshaft Position Sensor

7. Camshaft Position Sensor In order to meet Federal Exhaust Emission and Fuel Economy regulations, today’s vehicles are equipped with highly sophisticated electronic engine control systems. These systems do not require periodic adjustments. The only services required on a scheduled basis are spark plug and filter replacement. Tune-ups, as we knew them, are no longer necessary.

Engine Control Computer

engineThe computer receives information from a network of sensors and switches that convert engine operating conditions into electrical signals. Based on the information and instructions stored in the computer program, commands are then sent to three primary systems:

Ignition System

Fuel System

Emission Control System

The sensors that monitor one or more of these systems include:

• Mass Airflow Sensor

• Throttle Position Sensor

• Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor

• Coolant Temperature Sensor

• Exhaust Oxygen Sensor

• Crankshaft Position Sensor

• Camshaft Position Sensor

In today’s modern systems cars have a “check engine” or “service eng soon” or “power loss” light that will come on in the event the engine controller detects a sensor out of its specified ranges, and store a “trouble code.” Today’s technician must then interface the computer with a “scan tool”, read diagnostic codes, verify and trace the problem to:

• Connections and corrosion

• Faulty sensors

• Faulty or tampered with wiring

• Module or controller problems • Component or part failures

Brakes

brakes

The brake system is actually composed of two kinds of systems—Hydraulics and Friction Materials. Here’s what happens within these systems between the time your foot hits the brake pedal and your car stops.

Hydraulics
Master Cylinder
When pressure is applied to the brake pedal, the master cylinder creates hydraulic pressure which pushes brake fluid to the wheel brakes.

Brake Lines and Hoses
Steel brake lines and high pressure rubber hoses are the avenues through which the pressurized brake fluid travels.

Wheel Cylinders and Calipers
These are the hydraulic cylinders that apply pressure to the friction materials, causing your car to stop.

 

Friction Materials
Disc Brake Pads and Drum Brake Shoes
These brake linings are composed of high temperature materials that create the friction that stops your car.

Types of Brakes
Disc Brakes
Disc brakes consist of a Disc Brake Rotor, which is attached to the wheel, and a Caliper, which holds the Disc Brake Pads. Hydraulic pressure from the Master Cylinder causes the Caliper Piston to clamp the Disc Brake Rotor between the Disc Brake Pads.
This creates friction between the pads and rotor, causing your car to slow down or stop.

Drum Brakes
Drum brakes consist of a Brake Drum attached to the wheel, a Wheel Cylinder, Brake Shoes and Brake Return Springs. Hydraulic pressure from the Master Cylinder causes the Wheel Cylinder to press the Brake Shoes against the Brake Drum. This creates friction between the shoes and drum to slow or stop your car.

Parking Brake
The Parking Brake uses Cables to mechanically apply the brakes (usually the rear brake.)  This is used to prevent the car from rolling when not being driven.

Anti-Lock Brakes: A System Built For Safety
Computer-controlled anti-lock braking systems (ABS) are a recently developed safety feature.  When sudden stops are made, the ABS prevents wheel lock-up. The system is comprised of  wheel-speed sensors that monitor wheel rotation, computer-controlled hydraulics that pulse the brakes on and off rapidly, and the on-board computer.

Wheel Alignment

alignmentWheel alignment is the position of the wheels relative to your car. When properly aligned, the wheels point in the right direction. Without proper alignment, the wheels resist your steering commands, as well as each other. Alignment also affects gas mileage and tire wear. If your tires are pointed in different directions, they fight against each other and can cause tread wear.

Computerized alignment equipment is used to measure all alignment angles on today’s cars. These include both adjustable and non-adjustable angles. (Non-adjustable angles require repair or replacement of the suspension component.) The most common adjustable angles are:

Toe
This refers to the tilted direction of the wheels toward or away from one another when viewed from the top. Toe is the most critical tire wearing angle. Tires that “toe-in” point toward one another. Tires that “toe-out” point away from each other.

 

Camber
This refers to the tilt of the wheels toward or away from one another when viewed from the front. Wheels that tilt in toward the vehicle have “negative camber.” Wheels that tilt away from the vehicle have “positive camber.”

Caster
This refers to the angle of the steering axis in relation to an imaginary vertical line through the center of the wheel when viewed from the side. “Positive caster” is the term used when the vertical line is tilted back toward the rear. If it’s tilted forward, we call it “negative caster.” The proper caster angle stabilizes your car for better steering.

Thrust Angle
This refers to the relationship of all four wheels to each other, as well as their relationship to an imaginary center line that runs from bumper to bumper. The term “thrust line” refers to the direction in which the rear wheels are pointed. Thrust angle is correctable on cars with adjustable rear suspensions. If your car has a non-adjustable suspension, thrust angle is compensated for by aligning the front wheels to the rear wheels.

Rim Straightening

Encino Tire & Service technicians can straighten virtually any bent car or truck rim. Whether it’s a 15? OEM or 24? custom rim – no job is too small or too large. This includes steel, aluminum and chrome rims.

Sherman Oaks Tire has the straightening devices to get the job done right. Each rim is first inspected with a highly sensitive measuring instrument to determine the exact location and severity of the bend. The damaged area is then brought back to original manufacturers’ specifications by using very specialized wheel straightening machinery.

Cosmetic Repair & Polishing

cosmetic_repair-300x166With our reconditioning tools, proprietary paints and clearcoat process, we can remove curb rash, scrapes, gouges and discoloration caused by age. It’s a specialized process that ensures a match with the undamaged wheels.

There are many variations of standard silver wheel finishes depending on the concentration of metallic within the paint. More metallic generally gives off a brighter finish, while less metallic yields a flatter finish. There is also a class of finishes known as hyper silver.

Your Encino Tire professional is highly skilled in matching all these finishes. Polished aluminum wheels can also be brought back to like-new condition.

Copyright © Encino Tire & Service

Web site by WavMixer